Taking estrogen supplements as part of a hormone replacement therapy regime has its effects on your hair as well. Women can treat a type of hair loss called androgenic alopecia, associated with low estrogen and progesterone, by replacing these hormones artificially. Dosages of synthetic estrogen should be monitored regularly -- abnormal hair growth is a possible side effect of one kind of hormone replacement therapy, called esterified estrogens.
What’s more likely is that telogen effluvium is at play (again). In addition to hormone fluctuations, this type of hair loss happens when there is a drastic dip in protein in the diet or sudden weight loss. For example, if you are sick and can only consume liquids for a month. “If you have protein levels that drop dramatically, your hair follicles go into hibernation, and you can see sudden acute hair loss that shows up three to six months later,” says Dr. Katta.
Other conditions, which can cause eyebrow hair loss, include infection by a number of fungal infection, which are common, both on your scalp and eyebrow areas, affliction by pests such as lice, which will cause itching, and scratching. Infiltrating disorders such as scars, alopecia mucinosis, and sclerosing disorder could also cause brow hair loss. If you are heavily using any of the following drugs, they could also cause eyebrow hair loss:
Anagen effluvium occurs after any insult to the hair follicle that impairs its mitotic or metabolic activity. This hair loss is commonly associated with chemotherapy. Since chemotherapy targets your body’s rapidly dividing cancer cells, your body’s other rapidly dividing cells such as hair follicles in the growing (anagen) phase, are also greatly affected. Soon after chemotherapy begins approximately 90 percent or more of the hairs can fall out while still in the anagen phase.

I’m no Frida Kahlo, but since my teenage years, I’ve been blessed with thick, full eyebrows. But as soon as I turned 30, I noticed something was amiss. My beautiful brows were looking, let’s say, sparse. Every time my brow specialist handed me a magnified mirror after my monthly wax, it seemed I had more patchy spots. My low-maintenance morning routine—a quick brush-up and pencil fill-in—was suddenly taking up a lot more time. I found myself on a constant quest for the best brow powders, pencils, and gels, and started researching microblading in hopes of finding a solution.


DLE is an autoimmune condition and is the most common form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus.[35] Clinically, the lesions start as discoid erythematous patches which then develop into plaques with follicular plugging and scaling. Eyelid findings include blepharitis, lid scarring, entropion, and ectropion. Scaly plaques on the eyelids with loss of hair follicles results in madarosis[60] [Figure 3]. Numerous studies have reported the mimicking of a chronic blepharitis by DLE.[35,61–63] A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases, where the diagnosis is very often delayed by months to years.[35] Biopsy with histopathological examination should be done to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment with hydroxychloroquine results in a regrowth of the eyelashes.[61]
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