This “mature” hairline is not considered balding; the Norwood III is considered the first evidence of balding in androgenetic alopecia (male pattern baldness). In studying the Norwood charts, we see that usually the most advanced balding is known as a class VII, and that there are also Type “A” variants in which the forelock in the middle tends to recede along with the fronto-temporal areas, and in which there is be less overt crown loss than in the regular III, IV, and V patterns.
Around 30 million U.S. women will experience hereditary hair loss, or female pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia), while others will struggle with situational hair loss, brought on by medical conditions, medications, poor health and nutrition, environmental factors such as smoking and sun damage, or even from adverse reactions to hair care products or treatments. 

Another reason why hair falls out is lupus. Lupus is an autoimmune disease that may make your immunity system begin attacking your various healthy body tissues. According to Medical News Today, “this results in symptoms such as inflammation, swelling, and damage to joints, skin, kidneys, blood, the heart, and lungs”. It can also attack eyebrow follicle resulting sudden hair loss and including brows.
Yes. Hyperandrogenism, a medical condition characterized by excessive production of male hormones called androgens, can cause hair loss in affected women. The most common cause of hyperandrogenism in women is functional ovarian hyperandrogenism, also known as polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition to hair loss, other signs include obesity, acne, and irregular menstruation, and it is one of the most common causes of infertility.
Cyproterone acetate works in several ways. It not only competitively blocks DHT from binding to its receptors at target tissue (Gilman et al., 1990), but it is also a progestogen that lowers testosterone levels by decreasing the release of luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones through pituitary-mediated supression (Gilman et al., 1990, Varothai and Bergfeld, 2014). An open intervention study of 80 women who received treatment with spironolactone (200 mg daily) or cyproterone acetate (50 mg daily or 100 mg for 10 days per month if premenopausal) showed that three of four patients demonstrated an improvement or stabilization of their disease with no difference of effect between the therapies received (Sinclair et al., 2005).
A. I think it's a personal preference, but why is a cosmetic solution such a big deal? To use sprays, powders and hair extensions? It doesn't address the problem, but it can do wonders for your self-esteem. I see patients who are extremely depressed, and this is ruining their life. We always have hope for that miracle solution, but it's very hard to do research studies. … As much as this affects people's mentality, there's not a lot of (National Institutes of Health) funding because hair loss isn't killing anyone.
Monitor any hair loss when starting new medications. Numerous medications can cause temporary or permanent hair loss, including chemotherapy,[28] antidepressants, and mood stabilizers.[29] Nonetheless, many other medications can cause hair loss in isolated cases. If you've noticed hair loss after starting a new medication, talk to your doctor about this side effect.
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