While female hair loss may not cause physical pain, it does cause mental anguish. Fortunately, in many cases, female hair loss can be successfully treated with today’s advanced nonsurgical and surgical treatment options. After a diagnosis has been confirmed, Dr. Yaker will create a customized treatment plan depending on one’s hair characteristics, the level of hair loss and the aesthetic goals of the patient.
Hansen’s disease – Hansen’s disease, popularly known as leprosy could cause loss of eyebrows. This condition is cause by infection of a bacterial known as mycobacterium leprae and if it affects your eyebrows region, you expect to lose some eyebrows i.e. if it affects your eyebrow skin region, a place it often afflicts, you could suffer from permanent eyebrow hair loss as ‘Tulay Cakiner-Egilmez, Ph.D., R.N’ reports in ‘Journal of the American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses’. This and other infections that can cause loss of eyebrows.
There are numerous diseases that can affect the hair and scalp. Hair loss can be caused by a variety of conditions. Diseases such as alopecia areata, anemia, male/female pattern baldness, and infections of the scalp can all cause significant difficulty and loss of daily well-being. Stanford Dermatology has established a special clinic focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders of the hair.
The most common type of hair loss seen in women is androgenetic alopecia, also known as female pattern alopecia or baldness. This is seen as hair thinning predominantly over the top and sides of the head. It affects approximately one-third of all susceptible women, but is most commonly seen after menopause, although it may begin as early as puberty. Normal hair fall is approximately 100-125 hairs per day. Fortunately, these hairs are replaced. True hair loss occurs when lost hairs are not regrown or when the daily hair shed exceeds 125 hairs. Genetically, hair loss can come from either parents side of the family.
DLE is an autoimmune condition and is the most common form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus.[35] Clinically, the lesions start as discoid erythematous patches which then develop into plaques with follicular plugging and scaling. Eyelid findings include blepharitis, lid scarring, entropion, and ectropion. Scaly plaques on the eyelids with loss of hair follicles results in madarosis[60] [Figure 3]. Numerous studies have reported the mimicking of a chronic blepharitis by DLE.[35,61–63] A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases, where the diagnosis is very often delayed by months to years.[35] Biopsy with histopathological examination should be done to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment with hydroxychloroquine results in a regrowth of the eyelashes.[61]
Basak et al. reported 10 cases of periocular tinea which had been misdiagnosed for a long time before the correct diagnosis was made. Only two cases had the central clearing typical of tinea corporis, but all of them were associated with madarosis. There was an improvement in the lesions as well as the madarosis following treatment with topical and systemic antifungals.[86]
Although it’s generally only prescribed as a last resort for menopausal symptoms, hormone replacement therapy is a common and very effective hair loss treatment for some women — as long as they are menopausal or post-menopausal and are not at higher risk for adverse effects from HRT. It's most often prescribed for women who have androgenetic alopecia, also called pattern baldness. Hormone replacement therapy has a number of benefits for both general health and symptom management, but also a number of side effects — which range from unpleasant to dangerous.

Visit your doctor. First and foremost, you need to understand the cause of your thinning brows in order to know how to address them. Your doctor can check for underlying conditions like hypothyroidism, hormonal imbalance and vitamin deficiency. Your doctor can also point you in the right direction for products that can help regrow or mask thinning hair. Visit a dermatologist for targeted advice and cosmetic options that are available to you.

Not only that, but plucking, waxing, or threading can also lead to permanent eyebrow loss, ingrown hairs, and infections. With repeated trauma to the hair follicle, your follicle can become damaged and scarred. If this occurs, your hair may never grow back again. Make sure to be extra careful to only pull out the hairs that you want to remove when you are plucking your brows. You should also wash your tweezers with alcohol before you start plucking or seek treatment at a reputable salon to prevent infections.


Amalie Beauty Inc. and its materials are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. 
All material on Amalie is provided for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise, or other health program.
Another cause of eyebrow hair loss is genetic predisposition. Many patients naturally have thinner eyebrows that run in their family. This is one of the biggest reasons patients seek our services. Medical conditions such as hypothyroidism, eczema, and alopecia areata (spot baldness) can also lead to brow hair falling out. It’s important to determine the cause of your condition to find an effective treatment.
Dutasteride is a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor that binds both types I and II enzymes. Compared with finasteride, its inhibition of type II enzymes is three times more potent; its inhibition of type I enzymes is 100 times more potent (Clark et al., 2004). Dutasteride is not approved for the treatment of FPHL by the FDA, and ongoing studies on the efficacy of the inhibitor are promising but largely focus on male patients (Gupta and Charrette, 2014, Olsen et al., 2006). A study of women after 3 years of therapy showed that dutasteride may be more effective than finasteride in women under 50 years of age as measured by hair thickness (not hair density) at the center and vertex scalp (Boersma et al., 2014). One case report of a 46-year-old female with FPHL showed some response after 6 months of treatment with a dose of 0.5-mg dutasteride daily despite a minimal response to treatment with finasteride and minoxidil (Olszewska and Rudnicka, 2005). Data with regard to the treatment side effects in women is extremely limited. Dutasteride is classified as pregnancy category X because of teratogenicity and should have the same theoretical risk of breast cancer as mentioned in relation to finasteride (Kelly et al., 2016).
If, however, you aren’t so sure that any of the causes listed above are a problem for you, then a good place to start may be to talk with your healthcare provider about testing. It is important to learn the root cause – especially if dealing with infertility – because that which is causing hair thinning and shedding may also be contributing to your inability to conceive.
Androstenedione, which is mostly produced in the ovary and adrenal glands, is converted to testosterone by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Testosterone then circulates throughout the body to reach its target tissues. Androgen-metabolizing enzymes have been found in many parts of the hair follicle (Table 1; Bolognia et al., 2012). The presence of those enzymes makes the pilosebaceous unit a site of androgen metabolism and synthesis (Fazekas and Sandor, 1973). Circulating free testosterone either binds to intracellular androgen receptors in the hair bulb and dermal papilla, which facilitates miniaturization of the follicle, or is metabolized into dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by the enzyme 5-alpha-reductase. DHT then binds the same receptor but with much greater affinity (Kaufman, 2002, Levy and Emer, 2013). Of the androgens depicted in Figure 1, only DHT and testosterone bind to androgen receptors (Burger, 2002).
Yes. Hyperandrogenism, a medical condition characterized by excessive production of male hormones called androgens, can cause hair loss in affected women. The most common cause of hyperandrogenism in women is functional ovarian hyperandrogenism, also known as polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition to hair loss, other signs include obesity, acne, and irregular menstruation, and it is one of the most common causes of infertility.
Most women with pattern hair loss don't get a receding hairline or bald spot on top of the scalp as is common in men. Instead, there is visible thinning over the crown. In men and women, hairs are miniaturized because of a shortened growth cycle where the hair stays on the head for a shorter period of time. These wispy hairs, which resemble forearm hairs, do not achieve their usual length.
While these factors contribute to hair loss for any woman, it’s particularly dicey for those of us with PCOS because when the follicle is exposed to our elevated androgens such as DHT (di-hydro testosterone, an active metabolite of testosterone) it gets damaged. Whenever a cell is damaged it generates oxidative stress which further alters the androgen receptor in the follicle perpetuating the issue.
Eyebrows protect the eyes from sweat that trickles down the forehead. They also protect the bony ridges above the eyes. In addition to the above, the eyebrows play a very important function in facial expression and body language. Eyelashes protect the eyeball from small foreign bodies and irritants and stimulate the closing reflex. Both eyebrows and eyelashes play a very important cosmetic function, and thus contribute greatly to the self esteem of an individual.[9]
You will need to check with your health insurance company to find out if hormone replacement therapy will be fully or partially covered, or how much your copayment will be. If you don't have health insurance, costs can still vary greatly depending on the type of medication you get, and whether you take brand name or generic drugs. Prices may range from as little as about $7 per month to as high as $150 a month for hormone replacement therapy.
Some medications have side effects that include hair loss. Talk to your doctor if you are experiencing significant hair loss and you think that your medication might be the cause. Your doctor might be able to switch you over to another type of medicine without any reported side effects. Don’t stop taking your medications until you’ve spoken with your doctor, as this could be dangerous for your health.
Telogen effluvium, a type of scalp hair loss characterized by hair shedding, may affect the eyebrows as well. It can be caused by any emotional or physiological stress, for example acute or chronic illnesses, hormonal changes, nutritional deficiencies, and medications that alter the normal hair cycle and cause the hair the enter the telogen phase prematurely.
Hair loss in women is not easy to diagnose because it is very often multifactorial in etiology and thus requires well-designed specific steps so that the patient is evaluated properly. The best way to do this is to evaluate the patient in person (rather than sending photos via email or Skype) because the patient gets a chance to meet her doctor to permit the development of a trusting relationship- critical because very often the treatment of hair loss is an involved process that requires a strong doctor-patient relationship.
There are a couple of other reasons why soy is a great choice too. For one, it is really good for you, protecting your cardiovascular health by reducing your LDL cholesterol levels. For another, soy is an easy, cost-effective choice. Instead of searching everywhere for quality herbal supplements you are unfamiliar with, you can simply add some soy milk to your diet or eat some tofu.
MICHAEL REED, MD: Over-the-counter minoxidil, which is the brand Rogaine, is FDA approved. It's been shown to be effective in scientific studies. Propecia is the new drug on the block, and that probably is more effective. It's a pill that you take once a day, and that has been shown to slow down hair loss and grow hair in a significant number of individuals. Most of the other preparations that are heavily advertised or marketed are not proven to be effective.
Eyebrows frame your face and play an important role in your facial appearance and expressions. If the hair in your eyebrows starts falling out, you are sure to see a difference in your appearance, which you may want to rectify. Many conditions can cause eyebrow loss.[1] However, you can usually take steps to reverse the effects, such as eating a healthy diet and adjusting your beauty routine or lifestyle to account for the natural aging process.
Prostaglandins are modified forms of unsaturated fatty acids–those unsaturated or “essential” fatty acids (EFAs) that are also called Omega fatty acids. These EFAs cannot be produced by your body, but must be absorbed from our food. EFAs are naturally found in nut and seed oils in different compositions. EFAs have been shown to increase prostaglandin production in those with a deficiency (source, again).
Around 30 million U.S. women will experience hereditary hair loss, or female pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia), while others will struggle with situational hair loss, brought on by medical conditions, medications, poor health and nutrition, environmental factors such as smoking and sun damage, or even from adverse reactions to hair care products or treatments.

THE TREATMENTS If no trigger is present, it’s likely you have androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary condition that causes the hair follicles to get progressively thinner over the years. The most effective topical medication for the condition is minoxidil (brand name Rogaine), the only treatment for hair loss in women that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
Ludwig Scale: This is the most common classification for female pattern hair loss. There are 3 stages (ranging from mild hair loss to extensive, severe widespread thinning) and in each stage hair loss occurs on the front and top of the scalp with relative preservation of the frontal hairline. Regardless of the extent of hair loss, only women with stable hair on the back and sides of the scalp are candidates for hair transplant surgery.
Menopause is a natural biological process that all women experience at some point in their lives. During this time, the body goes through numerous physical changes as it adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels. Many women have unpleasant symptoms during menopause, including hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia. Hair loss is another common occurrence.
×