There’s no doubt that estrogen and hair loss are connected, but there are certain factors that determine how much of an effect estrogen levels have on your hair. As one of the main visible measures of your health, hair growth is often one of the first areas affected when hormones are off-balance. Let’s take a look at the links between estrogen hormonal imbalance and hair loss.
Surgeries, severe illnesses and emotional stress can cause hair loss. The body simply shuts down production of hair during periods of stress since it is not necessary for survival and instead devotes its energies toward repairing vital body structures. In many cases there is a three month delay between the actual event and the onset of hair loss. Furthermore, there may be another three month delay prior to the return of noticeable hair regrowth. This then means that the total hair loss and regrowth cycle can last 6 months or possibly longer when induced by physical or emotional stress. There are some health conditions which may go undetected that can contribute to hair loss. These include anemia or low blood count and thyroid abnormalities. Both of these conditions can be detected by a simple, inexpensive blood test.
“The biggest mistake I see is people being too heavy handed with their eyebrow products,” says Megan Studabaker, a registered nurse and owner of Finespun Brow Design in Scottsdale, Arizona. “I recommend applying products in hair-like strokes, versus just filling in with powder because it often gets smeared and messy which isn’t achieving the polished look you are going for.” I’ve had good luck using Benefit Precisely, My Brow Pencil ($24) and Foolproof Brow Powder ($24).
The real culprit appears to be dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent form of testosterone. DHT is made from testosterone by a specific enzyme in the body, and while both testosterone and DHT are known to have a weakening effect on hair follicles, there appears to be something unique about the conversion process of testosterone to DHT that relates to thinning hair. This is why some drugs that are marketed for hair loss block the conversion of testosterone to DHT. (It’s important to note, however, that these drugs tend to be less effective in women than men, and that one of them—finasteride—is only approved for hormonal hair loss in men, not women. What’s more, the drug has been associated with increased risk of sexual side effects, depression, nausea, hot flashes, and increased estrogen levels—and too much estrogen is its own risk factor for thinning hair; more on that below.)
Low iron and low B12 can arise from a variety of causes including autoimmunity, poor intake, depletion due to medications (i.e. antacids) or bad digestion and are common causes of hair loss. But other common nutrient deficiencies can arise as part of a less than stellar diet low in zinc, protein (especially the amino acid lysine) or a deficiency of vitamin B6 (a very common issue with women taking hormones like the birth control pill). Low vitamin D has also been linked to excessive hair loss as has excessive vitamin A intake (less common.) 

The most common type of hair loss seen in women is androgenetic alopecia, also known as female pattern alopecia or baldness. This is seen as hair thinning predominantly over the top and sides of the head. It affects approximately one-third of all susceptible women, but is most commonly seen after menopause, although it may begin as early as puberty. Normal hair fall is approximately 100-125 hairs per day. Fortunately, these hairs are replaced. True hair loss occurs when lost hairs are not regrown or when the daily hair shed exceeds 125 hairs. Genetically, hair loss can come from either parents side of the family.


Thinning hair, noticeable bald spots, receding hair line, large clumps of hair showing up in your hair brush or shower drain, these are typically things you hear about from men, not women. More and more though, we are contacted by women who are experiencing hair loss who want to know if this is a sign of something wrong with their hormones and how they can fix the problem. Fortunately, hair loss is not a sign of infertility, but is a side effect of hormonal imbalance which can impact your fertility.


The first thing you'd want to try is to talk to your doctor about stopping the medicine -- ask if there's a substitute. If you can't find a substitute for the medication and you must take it, then you could consider filling in your eyebrows. You can find brow products at any local drugstore. YouTube has many, MANY brow tutorials you could learn from.
This “mature” hairline is not considered balding; the Norwood III is considered the first evidence of balding in androgenetic alopecia (male pattern baldness). In studying the Norwood charts, we see that usually the most advanced balding is known as a class VII, and that there are also Type “A” variants in which the forelock in the middle tends to recede along with the fronto-temporal areas, and in which there is be less overt crown loss than in the regular III, IV, and V patterns.
“The biggest mistake I see is people being too heavy handed with their eyebrow products,” says Megan Studabaker, a registered nurse and owner of Finespun Brow Design in Scottsdale, Arizona. “I recommend applying products in hair-like strokes, versus just filling in with powder because it often gets smeared and messy which isn’t achieving the polished look you are going for.” I’ve had good luck using Benefit Precisely, My Brow Pencil ($24) and Foolproof Brow Powder ($24).
Seborrheic dermatitis is a condition where you have itchiness in the eyebrows.. like serious, serious itchiness. First of all, if you think you have this: see a derm, stat. You need a derm to confirm (can I trademark that saying?), and you definitely need a derm for the prescription. A dermatologist will tell you to treat the seborrheic dermatitis with a combination of desonide cream and ketoconazole cream twice daily for one week. Or, they may tell you to use a ketoconazole shampoo to control the problem.
No one wants to lose their hair, but for a woman it is particularly distressing. While men can look perfectly presentable — even sexy — with their exposed scalp, no such options exist for the 30 million American women who grapple with thinning tresses. Dr. Maria Colavincenzo, a dermatologist at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, has a practice that specializes in preserving those precious strands — especially in cases of androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary condition that causes hair loss, mainly on the top and crown of the scalp. Without an appointment, she answered some of our questions:
Why am I losing my eyebrows or why are they falling out and not growing back? Is it a kind of brow disease? I have or could it be my over-plucking? Discover all the reasons why your eyebrows are thinning or falling out including over-plucking, eczema, thyroid problems, and chemotherapy among others. We will also cover treatments and ways to regrow your eyebrows back.
Take extra care in looking after your hair. Use a gentle, nourishing shampoo (we love Bumble and Bumble Gentle Shampoo) to promote good condition and prevent breakage. Try using a silk or satin pillowcase. Avoid harsh styling products and techniques that apply heat to the hair (blow drying, curling irons etc) as these can cause more damage to fragile hair.
It takes more than just an apple a day to keep the doctor away; if your diet lacks the key vitamins A, B, D and E or nutrients such as iron, calcium or the amino acid L-lysine, your hair may suffer. Nutrient deficiency doesn’t just affect the eyebrows—it may lead to hair loss on the scalp, feelings of fatigue and physical weakness, lightheadedness or inhibited concentration, heart palpitations and pale skin, among other serious symptoms.

While these factors contribute to hair loss for any woman, it’s particularly dicey for those of us with PCOS because when the follicle is exposed to our elevated androgens such as DHT (di-hydro testosterone, an active metabolite of testosterone) it gets damaged. Whenever a cell is damaged it generates oxidative stress which further alters the androgen receptor in the follicle perpetuating the issue.
Anagen effluvium occurs after any insult to the hair follicle that impairs its mitotic or metabolic activity. This hair loss is commonly associated with chemotherapy. Since chemotherapy targets your body’s rapidly dividing cancer cells, your body’s other rapidly dividing cells such as hair follicles in the growing (anagen) phase, are also greatly affected. Soon after chemotherapy begins approximately 90 percent or more of the hairs can fall out while still in the anagen phase.
Amalie Beauty Inc. and its materials are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. 
All material on Amalie is provided for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise, or other health program.
Every child deserves the opportunity to just be a kid—to fit in and feel normal. Kids experiencing hair loss don’t get that chance. That’s why we offer the Hair Club For Kids® program. Hair Club For Kids provides non-surgical hair replacement services, completely free of charge, to children ages 6-17 who are suffering from hair loss. These services are available at all Hair Club locations throughout North America to help reach as many kids as possible. Call 800-269-7384 for details.
Here is one small European study which looked at 20 pre-menopausal women with female pattern hair loss to check their serum levels of estradiol, free and total testosterone, SHBG, LH, FSH, and DHEAS. These levels were compared to those of a control group without hair loss. Estradiol is one of the three naturally occurring forms of estrogen found in the body.

Microblading is a semipermanent way to fill in brows that looks more natural than permanent makeup or tattooing. “Microblading differs from tattooing and the traditional form of permanent makeup in that it is typically done by hand versus a machine and doesn’t go as deep into the skin,” explains Studabaker. “In the past, tattooing and traditional permanent makeup usually resulted in a solid line and the color could change significantly with time.”
NEIL SADICK, MD: Dermatologists are experts in the field of hair disorders. All dermatologists are trained in the general knowledge and treatment of hair loss disorders, but not all dermatologists choose to do this. A dermatologist will often refer to a specialist. Most dermatologists who are trained and have some expertise in this area usually deal both with men and women.
Around 30 million U.S. women will experience hereditary hair loss, or female pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia), while others will struggle with situational hair loss, brought on by medical conditions, medications, poor health and nutrition, environmental factors such as smoking and sun damage, or even from adverse reactions to hair care products or treatments.
During and after pregnancy, estrogen levels may frequently rise and then dip back down quickly. This sudden dip is what leads to hair loss after giving birth, which can be normal and should stop as hormone levels balance again. If hair loss is accompanied by a myriad of other symptoms post pregnancy, there may be a deeper issue beyond normal hormone fluctuations, such as thyroid function. “But exhaustion, feeling down, difficulty losing weight, intense struggle to produce enough breast milk, and hair loss aren’t always just a normal part of having had a baby,” says Dr. Aviva Romm. If you are experiencing any of these issues post pregnancy, do talk to your doctor about what you are going through.
"Dr. Yaker was extremely personable as well as knowledgeable on hair and hair health. With his treatment plan that was tailored to my needs and requests, I have noticeable thicker and fuller hair within three months! His enthusiasm towards his work was very comforting. He truly puts the patient at the center of care he delivers and it doesn't go unnoticed! I would highly recommend him as your physician if you are struggling with the appearance of your hair!"
“When I went in for my Bosley consultation, my senior counselor was the one who walked me through the procedure. He also had had the procedure done, and his results were phenomenal. And I was thinking, ‘Wow, if I can get that, that’s what I’m looking for.’ He really got it — he understood me. He understood what I went through, and that was really important to me.

You may have thought you were one up on men in the biological war but not only testosterone-strong males experience hair loss. In fact (and unfairly), up to 50% of women will experience some form of hair loss in their lifetime. You might have heard that pregnancy, the contraceptive pill and menopause are possible causes of hair loss, but are they really? Well, yes and no. An understanding of why female hair loss happens and what role estrogen plays in hair growth may help to make this answer clearer.
In your quest for perfectly maintained brows, you probably keep regular maintenance appointments on your calendar. Instead, you might want to embrace a more natural, hands-off approach. “The trauma inflicted on hair follicles during waxing, tweezing, and threading can lead to permanent follicular damage,” explains Dr. Umar. “Women who grew up in the height of the ’90s overplucked, pencil-thin brow trend have begun to notice the difficulty in growing thicker eyebrows after years of this habit.”
Modern medical studies and research have not found any cure or possible medication for Alopecia. However, there are various treatments available for hair growth, or at least temporarily. It is recommended to consult a medical expert or dermatologists to gain more knowledge regarding the condition before undergoing through treatment and medications. Listed are treatments and products under cosmetic dermatology and general dermatology which could help you with your skin concern.

If you’ve overplucked your brows too many times, you may have caused trauma to the follicles in the meantime, signalling not only those hairs you plucked to stop growing back, but also the hairs in surrounding areas. The good news: If the hair follicles aren’t dead, they can possibly be shaken from their resting state with a good brow enhancer. (like WINK  yes of course, we have to say it). There’s no sure bets, but it’s worth a try–plus Wink has a money-back guarantee!

Liver support: is necessary to eliminate unneeded wastes from the body. Everything we take in is processed through the liver and toxins are broken down into water soluble byproducts so they can be moved into the intestine and pulled into the stool for elimination. Foods like cruciferous vegetables (kale, broccoli, collard greens) and lemon support the liver detox pathways. Herbs like milk thistle, dandelion root, and burdock root help to support  liver cleansing.


However, the effects of alopecia reach far beyond symptoms of depression and include anxiety, obsessions, dissatisfaction with one’s appearance, and low self-esteem (Al-Mutairi and Eldin, 2011, Dlova et al., 2016, Hunt and McHale, 2005, Schmidt et al., 2001). There can be significant disturbance in a patient’s social life because they may change their hair style, clothing, or avoid social meetings (Al-Mutairi and Eldin, 2011). One study reported that 40% of surveyed women described marital problems and 63% had career-related issues that they ascribed to their hair loss (Hunt and McHale, 2005). These effects seem to occur regardless of patients’ age, race, or degree of hair loss (Dlova et al., 2016, Hunt and McHale, 2005, Schmidt et al., 2001). Another study of more than 200 women found that this psychologic morbidity occurs with equal frequency in women whose hair is typically covered by a headscarf (Erol et al., 2012).


There are numerous diseases that can affect the hair and scalp. Hair loss can be caused by a variety of conditions. Diseases such as alopecia areata, anemia, male/female pattern baldness, and infections of the scalp can all cause significant difficulty and loss of daily well-being. Stanford Dermatology has established a special clinic focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders of the hair.
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.
Interestingly, 40% of the genes causing male pattern baldness were located on the X chromosome. You inherit that chromosome from your mother. By analyzing all these genes, researchers could also make a “scorecard” which predicts what risk a man runs for experiencing hair loss based on his genes. The hope is that in the future, this could be refined and used to prevent early signs of hair loss.
“…a beauty editor told me she had been using Viviscal... Since beauty editors see truckloads of products every week, I was immediately convinced when she said it worked – so I bought it myself. I started taking it twice a day for the first six months and saw dramatic results within three to four months. My hair was less thinned out …and it was also less brittle. I’ve gone to the same hairdresser since I was 19, and he was the first to comment on how full and strong my hair looked…”
Scurf refers to the scales and greasy crusts that accumulate along the hair shaft and indicates the presence of seborrhea.[26,27] Collarettes are composed of hard fibrinous scales[25,28] surrounding each individual eyelash. They travel upward along with the growth of the lashes and are indicative of staphylococcal infection. Sleeves or cylindrical dandruff comprise scales that form a cuff around the lash root and are connected with it, in contrast to greasy scales which are not connected to the lash root.[29] Sleeves indicate infestation with Demodex folliculorum.
It is important to understand the phases of hair growth which play an important role when in further understanding some of the causes of hair loss. During the active phase known as anagen the cells multiply at the follicle and push out to form the shaft. It is followed by a transitional phase known as catagen where the outer layer of the hair shrinks and it becomes attached to the root. Thereafter there is a resting phase known as telogen where there is no growth or changes in the hair.
A little farther up the follicle is the mysterious feature called the bulge. That's where follicle stem cells live. When they get the right set of chemical signals, these self-renewing cells divide. They don't divide like normal cells, in which both halves become new cells that keep splitting and developing. Only one half of the follicle stem cell does that. The other half becomes a new stem cell, and stays put for future regeneration.
Physicians such as dermatologists and plastic surgeons have long recommended essential vitamins and supplements for hair growth to women and men. Now read why top medical experts including Dr. Craig Ziering and Dr. Steven Dayan have been telling their patients for years about Viviscal hair growth supplements to help grow thicker, longer and healthier looking hair.

Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is the result of a hormonal imbalance. Specifically, it’s related to a lowered production of estrogen and progesterone. These hormones help hair grow faster and stay on the head for longer periods of time. When the levels of estrogen and progesterone drop, hair grows more slowly and becomes much thinner. A decrease in these hormones also triggers an increase in the production of androgens, or a group of male hormones. Androgens shrink hair follicles, resulting in hair loss on the head. In some cases, however, these hormones can cause more hair to grow on the face. This is why some menopausal women develop facial “peach fuzz” and small sprouts of hair on the chin.


Cyproterone acetate works in several ways. It not only competitively blocks DHT from binding to its receptors at target tissue (Gilman et al., 1990), but it is also a progestogen that lowers testosterone levels by decreasing the release of luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones through pituitary-mediated supression (Gilman et al., 1990, Varothai and Bergfeld, 2014). An open intervention study of 80 women who received treatment with spironolactone (200 mg daily) or cyproterone acetate (50 mg daily or 100 mg for 10 days per month if premenopausal) showed that three of four patients demonstrated an improvement or stabilization of their disease with no difference of effect between the therapies received (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Stress: Emotional and physiological stress can trigger a few hair loss conditions that can affect your eyebrows. Telogen effluvium, for instance, can cause your hair to shed. Then there’s trichotillomania, which is a psychiatric condition caused by stress that is characterized by the urge to pull out your own hair (which could be from your eyebrows, eyelashes or scalp).
Contact dermatitis causes skin inflammation and when severe it can affect the hair follicles as well. It can either be due to some irritant making contact with the skin of the eyebrows or due to a substance to which a person has an allergy. This gives rise to the two types of contact dermatitis – irritant contact dermatitis or allergic contact dermatitis. Substances that could cause contact dermatitis at the eyebrow includes eye makeup including eyebrow pencils, hair removal creams and waxes, other cosmetics, hair dyes and scalp hair styling products.
Balancing your hormones is not an easy process, whether you are in perimenopause, menopause, or post-menopause. You may find that just one of these herbs is sufficient to do the trick, but in many cases you will achieve the best results by taking a combination of herbs. Start gradually and track your results carefully to make sure you are choosing the right products to balance and adjust your particular hormone profile.
Madarosis is a clinical sign that has become pathognomonic of leprosy in countries like India. However, this apparently benign clinical sign has wider ramifications in many systemic and dermatological disorders. Hence, establishing a proper diagnosis and appropriate management is mandatory. Though management of the primary disease results in regrowth of eyebrows and eyelashes, many require surgical management. Thus, the management of a patient with madarosis requires a coordinated effort from the dermatologist, ophthalmologist, internist, and reconstructive surgeon.
×