However, the effects of alopecia reach far beyond symptoms of depression and include anxiety, obsessions, dissatisfaction with one’s appearance, and low self-esteem (Al-Mutairi and Eldin, 2011, Dlova et al., 2016, Hunt and McHale, 2005, Schmidt et al., 2001). There can be significant disturbance in a patient’s social life because they may change their hair style, clothing, or avoid social meetings (Al-Mutairi and Eldin, 2011). One study reported that 40% of surveyed women described marital problems and 63% had career-related issues that they ascribed to their hair loss (Hunt and McHale, 2005). These effects seem to occur regardless of patients’ age, race, or degree of hair loss (Dlova et al., 2016, Hunt and McHale, 2005, Schmidt et al., 2001). Another study of more than 200 women found that this psychologic morbidity occurs with equal frequency in women whose hair is typically covered by a headscarf (Erol et al., 2012).
So, if you have a similar paranoia—fear not! Losing strands is totally normal. But Dr. Wexler is quick to add that things like over-tweezing (it causes scarring to the follicles), waxing, severe weight-loss, stress, excessive touching, hormonal changes, and auto immune disease can cause irregular brow hair loss. If you believe your case may be extreme, it's best to see a specialist.
Karen Hellesvig-Gaskell is a broadcast journalist who began writing professionally in 1980. Her writing focuses on parenting and health, and has appeared in “Spirituality & Health Magazine" and “Essential Wellness.” Hellesvig-Gaskell has worked with autistic children at the Fraser School in Minneapolis and as a child care assistant for toddlers and preschoolers at the International School of Minnesota, Eden Prairie.
If you’ve undergone chemotherapy recently, you know the effects that it has on your hair, including your brows and lashes. First of all, I want to point you to this awesome resource by FairyHairs (click here), that shows in intervals, with pictures, what you can expect with regrowing your hair after chemo (Thank you, Jenny Mealy!). The article also includes ways to regrow your hair after chemo.
In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant.
Eyelash hairs are usually present in two to three rows, and are short, thick, and curved in appearance. They are set obliquely, anterior to the palpebral muscle. The upper eyelashes are more numerous and curve upward, while the lower eyelashes curve down in order to avoid interlacing during eyelid closure. Eyelash cilia are unique in that they have no erector muscles. Eyelash hairs are oval in all races.[7]
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There’s no doubt that estrogen and hair loss are connected, but there are certain factors that determine how much of an effect estrogen levels have on your hair. As one of the main visible measures of your health, hair growth is often one of the first areas affected when hormones are off-balance. Let’s take a look at the links between estrogen hormonal imbalance and hair loss.
Madarosis is a terminology that refers to loss of eyebrows or eyelashes. This clinical sign occurs in various diseases ranging from local dermatological disorders to complex systemic diseases. Madarosis can be scarring or non-scarring depending upon the etiology. Appropriate diagnosis is essential for management. Follicular unit transplantation has been found to be a useful method of treating scarring madarosis and the procedure relevant to eyebrow and eyelash reconstruction has been discussed. A useful clinical approach to madarosis has also been included for bedside diagnosis. The literature search was conducted with Pubmed, Medline, and Google scholar using the keywords madarosis, eyebrow loss, and eyelash loss for articles from 1960 to September 2011. Relevant material was also searched in textbooks and used wherever appropriate.
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