Most of us look at the eyebrows as a patch of hair that has an aesthetic purpose and it is often shaped for cosmetic purposes. Although the exact purpose of the eyebrows is not conclusively understood, it is believed to be prevent water or sweat from falling on to the eyes itself. For most people its function is of little concern compared to its cosmetic purpose. As with hair anywhere on the body, eyebrow hair and the follicles from where it arises can be prone to the same diseases and disorders which may lead to hair loss..
Basak et al. reported 10 cases of periocular tinea which had been misdiagnosed for a long time before the correct diagnosis was made. Only two cases had the central clearing typical of tinea corporis, but all of them were associated with madarosis. There was an improvement in the lesions as well as the madarosis following treatment with topical and systemic antifungals.[86]
Thyroid hormone receptors were detected in both dermal and epithelial compartments of the human pilosebaceous unit.[48] T4 and T3 decrease the apoptosis of hair follicles and T4 prolongs the duration of anagen in vitro.[49] Thyroidectomy delays initiation of anagen. Administration of thyroxine advances anagen, initiation of which is however delayed once toxic doses are given. Therefore, ratio of telogen to anagen hairs is increased in hypothyroidism as well as hyperthyroidism.[50] Thus, the hair follicles are affected in thyroid disorders, and madarosis is caused due to disturbances in hair cell kinetics. Hypothyroidism is associated with generalized hair loss probably due to coarse, dull, and brittle hair with reduced diameter.[51] The eyebrows and eyelashes may also be lost. Loss of lateral one-third of eyebrows known as Hertoghe sign[38] is a characteristic sign of hypothyroidism.[52] Some people also refer to it as Queen Anne's sign,[53] after Anne of Denmark whose portrait with shortened eyebrows has been interpreted by some as indicative of the presence of goiter, even though such a fact has not been proved by any known sources of information. Madarosis may even be the presenting sign in hyperthyroidism.[21] In hyperthyroidism, there is thinning with breaking off and shortening of hair.[54] Madarosis can also occur in hypopituitarism, hypoparathyroidism,[21] and hyperparathyroidism.[55]
Some medications have side effects that include hair loss. Talk to your doctor if you are experiencing significant hair loss and you think that your medication might be the cause. Your doctor might be able to switch you over to another type of medicine without any reported side effects. Don’t stop taking your medications until you’ve spoken with your doctor, as this could be dangerous for your health.
Ever since Cara Delevingne set the trend for thick eyebrows (although women on the eastern side of the Prime Meridian have been keeping their eyebrows luscious and strong since the dawn of time), the quest to keep your eyebrow hair supremely groomed and in shape has become the primary beauty concern of all women. So now that eyebrows have come into the razor sharp focus of beauty standards that women (again) need to adhere to, it can come as quite a shock for some when they start losing their eyebrow hair. One day you’re lovingly brushing out your thick luscious eyebrows and the next moment you find yourself desperately filling them in with every eyebrow pencil you can get your hands on. You’re confused. You’re anxious. You don’t know what’s going on. And you’re trying out every random hack that the internet spews at you to stop losing your eyebrow hair. Lady, you need to calm down for a second. First, figure out why you’re losing your eyebrow hair in the first place. Let’s look at a few possible causes of your eyebrow hair loss.
While female hair loss may not cause physical pain, it does cause mental anguish. Fortunately, in many cases, female hair loss can be successfully treated with today’s advanced nonsurgical and surgical treatment options. After a diagnosis has been confirmed, Dr. Yaker will create a customized treatment plan depending on one’s hair characteristics, the level of hair loss and the aesthetic goals of the patient.
Additionally, two other considerations are important for a patient who receives treatment for FPHL. First, there is a set of reasonable expectations in patients. Maintaining the current hair density can be considered a successful treatment because women tend to have further thinning as they age (Harfmann and Bechtel, 2015). Second, it is important to ensure that patients understand that progress is slow, and months or years can be required to see a significant improvement (Boersma et al., 2014, Yeon et al., 2011). In our practice, we wait at least 6 months to assess treatment efficacy.
Medicines may also help slow or prevent the development of common baldness. One medicine, minoxidil (brand name: Rogaine), is available without a prescription. It is applied to the scalp. Both men and women can use it. Another medicine, finasteride (brand name: Propecia) is available with a prescription. It comes in pills and is only for men. It may take up to 6 months before you can tell if one of these medicines is working.
Hi sir my name is azad alam i have eyebrow loss problem from many days ago.first had loss my hear and beard after some time everything wil have don.but some days later my eyebrow was beining loss.then i have use to start (rogan e jarari) this humdard madicin after this use madicine eyebrow was be improve.but after sometime problem have statr this problem till that.so please tell me any cure about this.
Despite the name androgenetic alopecia, the exact role of hormones is uncertain. It is well known that androgens affect the growth of the scalp and body hair and even Hippocrates observed 2,400 years ago that eunuchs did not experience baldness (Yip et al., 2011). However, hyperandrogenism cannot be the only pathophysiologic mechanism for FPHL because the majority of women with FPHL neither have abnormal androgen levels nor do they demonstrate signs or symptoms of androgen excess (Atanaskova Mesinkovska and Bergfeld, 2013, Schmidt and Shinkai, 2015, Yip et al., 2011). Furthermore, cases have been reported in which FPHL developed in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome or hypopituitarism with no detectable androgen levels (Cousen and Messenger, 2010, Orme et al., 1999).
Certain medical issues can also impair hair growth. An overactive or underactive thyroid gland can cause hair loss. So can iron deficiency. When women go through menopause and their estrogen levels fall, their hair often begins to thin. Many women also lose some hair a few months after giving birth because of the hormonal changes the body experiences.
Anagen effluvium occurs after any insult to the hair follicle that impairs its mitotic or metabolic activity. This hair loss is commonly associated with chemotherapy. Since chemotherapy targets your body’s rapidly dividing cancer cells, your body’s other rapidly dividing cells such as hair follicles in the growing (anagen) phase, are also greatly affected. Soon after chemotherapy begins approximately 90 percent or more of the hairs can fall out while still in the anagen phase.
Eyebrows frame your face and play an important role in your facial appearance and expressions. If the hair in your eyebrows starts falling out, you are sure to see a difference in your appearance, which you may want to rectify. Many conditions can cause eyebrow loss.[1] However, you can usually take steps to reverse the effects, such as eating a healthy diet and adjusting your beauty routine or lifestyle to account for the natural aging process.
A decline of estrogen, whether due to menopause or other hormonal imbalances, can also affect hair growth. You'll experience a thinning or loss of pubic hair as well as hair on your scalp if you have low levels of estrogen in your body. You might also experience unwanted hair growth on your face during menopause, when your estrogen levels are at their lowest. This phenomenon occurs because the lack of estrogen leaves you with a hormonal imbalance of sorts; you have more androgens, or male hormones, than female hormones in your body, which contributes to some male-like symptoms such as body and facial hair.
It is known that estrogen plays a great role in reducing bodily hair, in promoting the growth of the hair on your head, controlling height, reducing the muscle mass, promoting the breast growth, keeping the skin smooth, keeping away from wrinkles, regulating menstrual cycle in women, preventing fatigue, keeping away depression etc. From all these it can be known that estrogen hormone is important for the overall health of an individual.
Posterior blepharitis is characterized by either excessive foam in the tear film in the hypersecretory type, or plugging of the meibomian orifices in the obstructive type. Expression of the secretions reveals a turbid or toothpaste-like material.[32] If there is spillover inflammation of the anterior lid margin, there may be a loss of eyelashes.[33]

Elizabeth Willett is the Senior Herbalist and Lead Educator at NaturalFertilityInfo.com. She holds a BS in Mass Communications (2000) from Minnesota State University, and a Master of Arts degree (MA, 2010) in Holistic Health Studies with a specialization is herbalism from St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN. Liz has written over 200 articles on women’s fertility and brings a vast wealth of knowledge and expertise in holistic health and healing to Natural Fertility Info.com
Stress: Emotional and physiological stress can trigger a few hair loss conditions that can affect your eyebrows. Telogen effluvium, for instance, can cause your hair to shed. Then there’s trichotillomania, which is a psychiatric condition caused by stress that is characterized by the urge to pull out your own hair (which could be from your eyebrows, eyelashes or scalp).

It is known that estrogen plays a great role in reducing bodily hair, in promoting the growth of the hair on your head, controlling height, reducing the muscle mass, promoting the breast growth, keeping the skin smooth, keeping away from wrinkles, regulating menstrual cycle in women, preventing fatigue, keeping away depression etc. From all these it can be known that estrogen hormone is important for the overall health of an individual.


The first step in treatment is to identify the cause of the hair loss. Then, treat it appropriately. If an internal cause is the culprit, it should be addressed — for example, thyroid medication for thyroid disease or supplements for a nutritional deficiency. External skin conditions are often treated with topical medications, and, once treated, the hair loss usually recovers. I often recommend Latisse as an adjunctive treatment. Though frequently associated with eyelash lengthening, it is a great option for thickening brows. In fact, people with brows that thin with aging (I typically don't see this in women under 50) may want to opt for Latisse.
Yes. Hyperandrogenism, a medical condition characterized by excessive production of male hormones called androgens, can cause hair loss in affected women. The most common cause of hyperandrogenism in women is functional ovarian hyperandrogenism, also known as polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition to hair loss, other signs include obesity, acne, and irregular menstruation, and it is one of the most common causes of infertility.

Also, what we tend to forget is that while it’s easy for most women to recognize financial, emotional or overwhelm type stress, we also have internal metabolic and biochemical stresses like anemia, inflammation and nutrient deficiencies that we are often less aware of. Diet and exercise can also become stresses. It is well known that low calorie dieting or excessive exercise are commonly associated with hair loss.
Hair loss in women is not easy to diagnose because it is very often multifactorial in etiology and thus requires well-designed specific steps so that the patient is evaluated properly. The best way to do this is to evaluate the patient in person (rather than sending photos via email or Skype) because the patient gets a chance to meet her doctor to permit the development of a trusting relationship- critical because very often the treatment of hair loss is an involved process that requires a strong doctor-patient relationship.
This manifests in childhood with chronic lower eyelid dermatitis and is often associated with other types of allergic disorders.[36,37] The ocular features are eyelid dermatitis, Dennie-Morgan fold (an infraorbital fold or line due to lid edema in atopic dermatitis), keratitis, and a frequent association with keratoconus and cataracts. Loss of lateral third of eyebrows (Hertoghe sign)[38] is seen in atopic dermatitis due to constant scratching and rubbing.
Thyroid Dysfunction: Since the thyroid gland regulates many body functions by releasing hormones, any disruption in its functioning can cause loss of hair, including eyebrow hair. If your thyroid is underactive, it could cause you to lose the outer third of your eyebrow. The only way to treat thyroid dysfunction is through medication. However, there’s still no guarantee that your eyebrow hair will grow back.
Thyroid Dysfunction: Since the thyroid gland regulates many body functions by releasing hormones, any disruption in its functioning can cause loss of hair, including eyebrow hair. If your thyroid is underactive, it could cause you to lose the outer third of your eyebrow. The only way to treat thyroid dysfunction is through medication. However, there’s still no guarantee that your eyebrow hair will grow back.

Insulin, that helper hormone in charge of regulating blood sugar levels, also affects a number of different body processes, including fat storage, heart health and, you guessed it, hair growth. One study published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Risk found that women with some markers of insulin resistance have a greater risk for androgenic alopecia (AGA), or female pattern baldness. 

Optimal levels of estrogen help to grow full thick hair, while low estrogen levels lead to thin and stalled hair growth, which eventually leads to hair loss. Through the years, a women will go through various cycles of highs and lows in estrogen levels. Puberty is typically associated with high estrogen levels as a woman starts to cycle through menstruation. Pregnancy typically increases hormone production, but once the baby has been delivered the mother can experience a drop in estrogen levels, which can result in thinning and loss of hair. Typically, this corrects itself as the woman's body heals and hormonal regulation returns to normal.  The largest decline in estrogen levels is during menopause. Estrogen is secreted through the ovaries and adrenal glands. When a woman hits menopause, the ovaries’ estrogen production is significantly diminished, which puts an excess burden on the adrenals to produce it. However, as the adrenals are typically overburdened due to stress, symptoms of menopauses like hair loss and hot flashes occur prematurely and excessively for some. Nourishing the body and balancing stress levels will support gentle and graceful transitions.  

Eyelash hairs are usually present in two to three rows, and are short, thick, and curved in appearance. They are set obliquely, anterior to the palpebral muscle. The upper eyelashes are more numerous and curve upward, while the lower eyelashes curve down in order to avoid interlacing during eyelid closure. Eyelash cilia are unique in that they have no erector muscles. Eyelash hairs are oval in all races.[7]
There are numerous nonsurgical treatments that when combined, can offer significant hair improvements. Dr. Yaker’s TCHR Volumizing Glycolic Acid Shampoo and Conditioner help restore vitality to the hair by deep cleaning the scalp and reestablishing lost moisture content and physiological pH to the scalp and hair. Dr. Yaker has also formulated his own oral supplement, which is a blend of Aminoplex hair repair vitamins. This is made up of amino acids (building blocks of protein) that produce keratin, which makes up close to 97% of our hair. In addition, Dr. Yaker’s specially compounded FDA approved topical medication, Minoxidil (brand name: Rogaine®), is clinically proven to help slow down, stop and even reverse hair loss in women. Other nonsurgical therapies offered are Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) using the advanced LaserCap®, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) with placenta-derived extracellular matrix therapy to help restore thinning hair. Lastly, Dr. Yaker offers scalp and facial micropigmentation where permanent ink is applied to the skin, creating micro dots that replicate the natural appearance of hair. This is used for the scalp and eyebrows.
Several skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema, and seborrheic dermatitis, don't directly lead to hair loss, but cause inflammation (a symptom of these conditions) near the brow that may be to blame. The urge to scratch and rub the inflamed area can indirectly cause eyebrow hairs to fall out. Loss that occurs in this manner is usually patchy, but as it is generally non-scarring (the hair follicle is intact), eyebrows can and often do grow back.
DLE is an autoimmune condition and is the most common form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus.[35] Clinically, the lesions start as discoid erythematous patches which then develop into plaques with follicular plugging and scaling. Eyelid findings include blepharitis, lid scarring, entropion, and ectropion. Scaly plaques on the eyelids with loss of hair follicles results in madarosis[60] [Figure 3]. Numerous studies have reported the mimicking of a chronic blepharitis by DLE.[35,61–63] A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases, where the diagnosis is very often delayed by months to years.[35] Biopsy with histopathological examination should be done to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment with hydroxychloroquine results in a regrowth of the eyelashes.[61] 
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